No on Arizona Renewable Energy Standards Initiative (2018)

The Arizona Renewable Energy Standards Initiative could appear on the ballot in Arizona as an initiated constitutional amendment on November 6, 2018 if proponents can get 225,963 valid signatures by July 5, 2018. The ballot initiative was filed with the secretary of state on February 20, 2018.  Clean Energy for a Healthy Arizona and billionaire activist Tom Steyer of California are leading the campaign in support of the initiative.  DO NOT SUPPORT THE BALLOT INITIATIVE.  

EHJ opposes the initiative because it represents an environmental injustice to many of the vulnerable residents of Arizona.  It represents an environmental injustice because if the initiative passes and the Palo Verde nuclear power plant closes, it will be replaced with mostly fossil fuel-generated electricity, which will increase smog that will increase negative health  effects in minority and low-income communities.  Electricity bills will also increase, which will be a significant burden on vulnerable communities.

 Palo Verde nuclear power plant.  Fifty miles west of Phoenix.  Three units at Palo Verde create about 36 percent of Arizona's electricity

Palo Verde nuclear power plant.  Fifty miles west of Phoenix.  Three units at Palo Verde create about 36 percent of Arizona's electricity

The measure would require electric utilities that sell electricity in Arizona to acquire electricity from a certain percentage of renewable resources each year. The amount would increase each year from 12 percent in 2020 to 50 percent in 2030 and each year thereafter.  The measure would define renewable energy to include solar, wind, biomass, certain hydropower, geothermal, and landfill gas energies.

If the secretary of state certifies that enough valid signatures were submitted, the initiative is put on the next general election ballot. The secretary of state verifies the signatures through a random sampling of 5 percent of submitted signatures working in collaboration with county recorders. If the random sampling indicates that valid signatures equal to between 95 percent and 105 percent of the required number were submitted, a full check of all signatures is required. If the random sampling shows fewer signatures, the petition fails. If the random sampling shows more, the initiative is certified for the ballot. (Ballotpedia)